XC6VLX130T-1FFG784C

XC6VLX130T-1FFG784C

Manufacturer Part NumberXC6VLX130T-1FFG784C
DescriptionXC6VLX130T-1FFG784C
ManufacturerXilinx Inc
SeriesVirtex™ 6 LXT
XC6VLX130T-1FFG784C datasheet
 


Specifications of XC6VLX130T-1FFG784C

Number Of Logic Elements/cells128000Number Of Labs/clbs10000
Total Ram Bits9732096Number Of I /o400
Voltage - Supply0.95 V ~ 1.05 VMounting TypeSurface Mount
Operating Temperature0°C ~ 85°CPackage / Case784-BBGA, FCBGA
No. Of Logic Blocks20000No. Of Macrocells128000
Family TypeVirtex-6No. Of Speed Grades1
No. Of I/o's400Clock ManagementPLL
Core Supply Voltage Range1VRohs CompliantYes
Lead Free Status / RoHS StatusLead free / RoHS CompliantNumber Of Gates-
Other names122-1678  
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Virtex-6 Family Overview
The System Monitor does not require explicit instantiation in a design. Once the appropriate power supply connections are
made, measurement data can be accessed at any time, even pre-configuration or during power down, through the JTAG test
access port (TAP).
Low-Power Gigabit Transceivers
Ultra-fast serial data transmission between ICs, over the backplane, or over longer distances is becoming increasingly
popular and important. It requires specialized dedicated on-chip circuitry and differential I/O capable of coping with the
signal integrity issues at these high data rates.
All but one Virtex-6 device has between 8 to 72 gigabit transceiver circuits. Each GTX transceiver is a combined transmitter
and receiver capable of operating at a data rate between 480 Mb/s and 6.6 Gb/s. Lower data rates can be achieved using
FPGA logic-based oversampling. Each GTH transceiver is a combined transmitter and receiver capable of operating at a
rate between 9.95 Gb/s and 11.18 Gb/s. The GTX transmitter and receiver are independent circuits that use separate PLLs
to multiply the reference frequency input by certain programmable numbers between 4 and 25, to become the bit-serial data
clock. The GTH transceiver is a purpose-built design for 10 Gb/s rates and shares a single high-performance PLL between
four transmitter and receiver circuits. Each GTX and GTH transceiver has a large number of user-definable features and
parameters. All of these can be defined during device configuration, and many can also be modified during operation.
Transmitter
The GTX transmitter is fundamentally a parallel-to-serial converter with a conversion ratio of 8, 10, 16, 20, 32, or 40. The
GTH transmitter offers bit widths of 16, 20, 32, 40, 64, or 80 to allow additional timing margin for high-performance designs.
These transmitter outputs drive the PC board with a single-channel differential current-mode logic (CML) output signal.
TXOUTCLK is the appropriately divided serial data clock and can be used directly to register the parallel data coming from
the internal logic. The incoming parallel data is fed through a small FIFO and can optionally be modified with the 8B/10B,
64B/66B, or the 64B/67B (GTX only) algorithm to guarantee a sufficient number of transitions. The bit-serial output signal
drives two package pins with complementary CML signals. This output signal pair has programmable signal swing as well as
programmable pre-emphasis to compensate for PC board losses and other interconnect characteristics.
Receiver
The receiver is fundamentally a serial-to-parallel converter, changing the incoming bit serial differential signal into a parallel
stream of words, each 8, 10, 16, 20, 32, or 40 bits wide. The GTH transceiver offers 16, 20, 32, 40, 64, and 80 bit widths to
allow greater timing margin. The receiver takes the incoming differential data stream, feeds it through a programmable
equalizer (to compensate for PC board and other interconnect characteristics), and uses the F
input to initiate clock
REF
recognition. There is no need for a separate clock line. The data pattern uses non-return-to-zero (NRZ) encoding and
optionally guarantees sufficient data transitions by using the selected encoding scheme. Parallel data is then transferred into
the FPGA logic using the RXUSRCLK clock. The serial-to-parallel conversion ratio for GTX transceivers can be 8, 10, 16, 20,
32, or 40. The serial-to-parallel conversion ratio for GTH transceivers can be 16, 20, 32, 40, 64, or 80 for GTH.
Out-of-Band Signaling
The GTX transceivers provide Out-of-Band (OOB) signaling, often used to send low-speed signals from the transmitter to
the receiver, while high-speed serial data transmission is not active, typically when the link is in a power-down state or has
not been initialized. This benefits PCI Express and SATA/SAS applications.
Integrated Interface Blocks for PCI Express Designs
The PCI Express standard is a packet-based, point-to-point serial interface standard. The differential signal transmission
uses an embedded clock, which eliminates the clock-to-data skew problems of traditional wide parallel buses.
The PCI Express Base Specification Revision 2.0 is backwards compatible with Revision 1.1 and defines a configurable raw
data rate of 2.5 Gb/s, or 5.0 Gb/s per lane in each direction. To scale bandwidth, the specification allows multiple lanes to be
joined to form a larger link between PCI Express devices.
All Virtex-6 devices (except the XC6VLX760) include at least one integrated interface block for PCI Express technology that
can be configured as an Endpoint or Root Port, compliant to the PCI Express Base Specification Revision 2.0. The Root Port
can be used to build the basis for a compatible Root Complex, to allow custom FPGA-FPGA communication via the PCI
Express protocol, and to attach ASSP Endpoint devices such as Fibre Channel HBAs to the FPGA.
DS150 (v2.2) January 28, 2010
www.xilinx.com
Advance Product Specification
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